Ticks

Technically it is summer. I technically graduated the end of May with my associate degree from community college. I was the first student to complete a degree at this school completely online.  Currently, I am completing my very last course for my associate degree, statistics. I got the midterm out of the way this week. I have applied to an actual online college, just waiting to work out all the details for the fall semester.

Last weekend, I found out that I was bitten by a tick after the tick and I swelled up. By Tuesday morning, I had a decent fever. I began antibiotics as a precaution. I am not too far into the course, but so far it is much better than my typical antibiotic combination. I have been dealing with mild intestine pain and extra fatigue, that I think is related to the antibiotic. I have noticed an increase in joint pain after the bite. I have been given multiple warnings, by my doctors, that more symptoms can appear. I can either run into a flare of all illnesses or some forum of remission with the antibiotics.

Ticks carry more than just Limes Disease. Some include Anaplasmosis, Colorado tick fever, and Tularemia. For a complete list check http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/diseases/. It is essential to check for them and to remove them as soon as possible and properly. Some hospitals or medical centers want to test the tick so you can save it in a zip lock bag.

How to remove a tick

  1. “Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth easily with clean tweezers, leave it alone and let the skin heal.
  3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.
  4. Dispose of a live tick by submersing it in alcohol, placing it in a sealed bag/container, wrapping it tightly in tape, or flushing it down the toilet. Never crush a tick with your fingers.” (http://www.cdc.gov/ticks/removing_a_tick.html)

After a very brief google search, I came across https://www.lymedisease.org/, which seems to have additional practical information about Lymes Disease.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s