Effects of Chronic Pain

I have struggled greatly with pain for many years. It began as a child but was not as intense. I remember hearing people complain that they were in pain and it was just part of ageing so I figured it was a part of growing up. Little did I know it was abnormal. Searching for answers was no easy task. I am diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Ulcerative Colitis, Hyperadrenergic Postural tachycardia syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, Endometriosis, Mast Cell Activation, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia . In addition I have chronic kidney stones, currently battling abdominal pain, frequent cyst, frequent infections, and an extra kidney.

With the opioid endemic it is nearly impossible for most to begin an opioid for pain. Personally, I am allergic to the “alternative” medications such as Cymbal,Amitriptyline, and Neutron.

I can understand to a degree the opidoid endemic. But the other part of me does not get it. People should just accept the pain to some doctors.  Furthermore, those who do drugs will always find a way to obtain them.

I have had to be creative in my pain management. Pain can be dictating causing one to quit their job or miss evens. Weakness is common due to lack of movement/exercise. Moreover, pain causes mood disturbance such as anxiety and depression. Many chronic pain warriors struggle with painsomina which is insomnia due to extreme pain. It is all a vicious cycle. It also effects ones memory also known as brain fog.

Most times doing absolutely nothing is not an option. I have a lot of outside of the box pain tips and I will be starting a YouTube channel. I will be making a pain management video with all my tips. If requested I will also do a blog post on it.

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Unable to Eat

I was feeling good. Really good and beginning to actually function. I was hungry occasionally, tolerating sun, able to accomplish more, losing water weight, less pain, and more energy. I was feeling more confident about my treatment plan and relived that my efforts were paying off. I had visited family to help out with an emergency. Than of course, went back home. The following morning I felt a bit off. I thought I just over did it a little. However, by the following morning it was clear something was wrong once again.

I began out of no where vomiting. To be clear I never vomit with any of my chronic illnesses. I had the runs. Unable to eat and barely able to drink. I ran an extra bag of Saline fluids because it was a Saline day thankfully. I toughed it out all weekend. Finally giving in I went to the Emergency Room only to be “accidentally” sent home. I continued to get worse each day. I began having palpitations, chest pain, all my pain was intolerable by this time, and unable to eat more than two crackers at a time. Due to vomiting I missed all my meds, vitamins, and supplements for about two weeks. On the bright side I’m certain now this plan works.

I have never had to go to the emergency room twice in one week. I was hesitant and frustrated. It was not a smooth trip by any means. In fact, the doctor only agreed to treat me and admit me once my gastros office yelled at her for saying I should just be sent home. I had seen this ER doctor one other time for a mast cell reaction. She didn’t understand it or want to call my doctor so told me I was over reacting. #RareDiseaseStruggle

Finally, I was admitted, as I said. However, no one had much direction on what to do other than offer me food and some encouragement to try to eat. If I had energy it would have been tempting to yell at someone because if all I needed to do was try some food I wouldn’t need to stay in the hospital! They ran basic labs, a stool test, ultra sound, and part of a colonoscopy. They yielded results but nothing that gave them direction for treatment. My body was starving when I was admitted and left. I had half a dozen stones, low blood sugar, a broken cyst, and low vitamin levels. I slept in the beginning about 20 plus hours a day. In perspective I never nap.

This was by far the most frustrating hospital admission I ever had. While waiting for my scope I turned on worship music and just cried from the pain. I had to try to think ahead as most times it took about an hour if I needed anything.  When I got to my hospital room I struggled flushing the toilet from being weak.

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Finally I could get in a few bites of soup. So they allowed me to go home because no one was sure what else to do.

So why can’t I eat suddenly? Well, I have of course a well thought out theory. I believe I either got food poisoning or a virus. Due to this I was unable to keep my steroids in so I encountered a mild adrenaline crisis. Additionally, mild flare up of UC, EDS, POTS, and Lupus. To top it all off I have my suspicions that some sort of a mild motility disorder is going on as an overlapping illness with the EDS, Mast cell, and POTS trio.

My days currently are spent with my pets as I try to finish my bachelors degree. I attempt to stimulate appetite and eat extremely small meals. So far I am down about 18 pounds. Outside of that it is mainly resting. There’s not much you want to do when always running on empty.

My goal is to get back in all my meds and supplements because they have been life changing for me. No I have not acquired a magic pill but just another tool to add to my tool box. I follow up with my PCP this week and will be discussing the possibility of a UTI. Furthermore, bring up once again the fact that I am in pain when I eat still. I will see someone who works with my gastro and see if we make any progress. At this time, my doctors are against TPN. However, soon I am getting a PICC line Finally placed for my fluids.

I have 100% seen improvement just to be clear but improvement doesn’t mean I never have set backs. Everyone with an illness has ups and downs. I know in my heart this could have been much worse than it was. I will be working on getting out info on the elements of my plan that help me so much. Additionally keep an eye out soon for a transitioning home from the hospital post.

For when I am weak the Lord is my strength. My provider. My everything. Praise Him in every storm. I am beyond thankful for those He has placed in my life as support. He embraces me when things feel like a nightmare and provide comfort. He has chosen not to heal me but to hold me and I will praise His name forevermore 

Gastroparesis

In my personal option rare diseases do not get enough attention so anytime I have the spoons and time I am delighted to blog about any of them. Many doctors are not educated enough about them. Education for us all makes a huge difference.

Gastroparesis is considered a very rare disease but some argue that doctors are just not educated enough to diagnosis it. It can overlap with the trio overlapping illnesses including  Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, and Mast Cell Activation Syndrome. For anyone who has taken note of the fact that I have the trio I do not know for a fact if I have it and do not think my doctor would identify it. Furthermore, it is too difficult to tell on steroids and I’m allergic to part of the test.

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According to the found Gastroparesis is a GI track mobility disorder. In further detail they explain:

“Normally, the stomach empties its contents in a controlled manner into the small intestines. In gastroparesis, the muscle contractions (motility) that move food along the digestive tract do not work properly and the stomach empties too slowly.

Gastroparesis is characterized by the presence of certain long-term symptoms together with delayed stomach emptying in the absence of any observable obstruction or blockage. The delayed stomach emptying is confirmed by a test.”

Symptoms vary from person to person.

  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • A feeling of fullness after eating just a few bites
  • Vomiting undigested food eaten a few hours earlier
  • Acid reflux
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Abdominal pain
  • Changes in blood sugar levels
  • Lack of appetite
  • Weight loss and malnutrition

 

 

I recently saw a story that is a ray of hope in a cloudy sky of chronic illness and would love to share with you to encourage you.

In 2009 I was diagnosed with severe Gastroparesis and another auto immune disease. Gastroparesis is damage to the vagus nerve which doesn’t allow your stomach to empty its food contents properly. So your food can literally sit in your stomach for days instead of hours. It’s pretty miserable. Worse, the few effective medications available to help ease the symptoms were not an option for me due to an allergic reaction to them. In severe cases like mine there is the option to get a pacemaker installed in your stomach, but as I already have a pacemaker/defibrillator I was once again left with no solution to help me. Most recently, I was rushed to the ER because of hypoxia (low oxygen) that saw me admitted to the ICU for three days. I was told that all of my medications, heart related included, had built to life threatening toxicity due to the blockage directly caused by my Gastroparesis. I was in the hospital for another 5 days and taken off all my medications to detox my entire system. I used that “blank slate” to try a vitamin system (I know it sounds crazy, right?!)  which helped greatly with both my chronic and fibro pain. I’ve found through all this that doctors prescribe medication often, because they have no other solution. We don’t think about the life we lose because of the medications prescribed to us or the life the side effects take from us because we think that it’s helping us. For me, the medications that were supposed to help me almost took my life. I needed a balance like most of us of medications and natural elements.

If you would like more info on what this lovely lady did to improve her health please comment your e-mail. (I ask people to do this so that I can respect their privacy and provide ALL the information I have on hand possible pertaining to their illness. If you have an illness I have I have additional tips I would love to share with you).

Need more info on Gastroparesis check out this video

Foundation

What does Mayo say? 

Learn more from other patients on The Mighty

Mast Cell Activation: An Overview

Tightening in the throat that increases by the second. The grip, like no other. Strangling. Less air pushes through.  Constricting more. Will the airways close. Focus on breathing. On finding the —A wave of dizziness emerges as less air pretenses it’s self… Focus on finding the medication.

Near anaphylaxis. It has become a common occurrence although it has not yet become normal to work though. Mast Cell Activation Syndrome is one of a few new diagnosis I recently acquired.

I had hear of the disease in passing, but it was the furthest thing from my mind. When my POTS doctor asked if I had a lot of allergies I replied no thinking everyone has a list of allergies. My theory was everyone has allergies they are just unaware, which of course, is not true. Eventually, I made my way to an allergist and got conformation of my diagnosis. Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.

Defining Mast Cell Briefly

Mast cell are a vital part to our blood as they assist in the function of the immune system. They are found in many locations throughout the body. “Mast cells react to foreign bodies and injury by releasing a variety of potent chemical mediators, such as histamine, when activated. In a healthy person these chemicals will act beneficially to protect and heal the body, but in a person with MCAS these same chemicals are inappropriately triggered and released and have a negative effect on the body. ”

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Triggers

For someone with mast cell there are various triggers. Basically, anything at a given moment can trigger us. Many times I have been okay with a food or cream for months or year than react to it. Some triggers include Heat, cold or sudden temperature changes, Stress: emotional, physical, including pain, or environmental (i.e., weather changes, pollution, pollen, pet dander, etc.), exercise, fatigue, food or beverages, including alcohol, medications,  natural odors, chemical odors, perfumes and scents venom infections (viral, bacterial or fungal), and Sun. Additionally someone with mast cell can have a reaction to themselves which is the strangest concept in my option or idiopathic reactions.

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Some Symptoms

Symptoms are unique for everyone. They can be altered depending on the day or the trigger. There are many symptoms with Mast Cell.

An overview of some of the many symptoms:

  • Gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, and malabsorption
  • Low blood pressure
  • Fatigue
  • Itching, flushing, hives
  • Episodes of fainting or dizziness
  • Bone pain
  • Brain fog
  • Anxiety
  • Rapid weight gain or loss
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Chest pain and/or a racing heart
  • Anaphylaxis

Overlapping Illness

Most individuals have an overlapping illness or a few. It is common to have POTS (or Hyper POTS) and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. Additionally, some of these individuals have an autoimmune disease.

Treatment

Treating mast cell of course comes with challenges. The biggest challenge is that many people have a lot of medication allergies. One of the goals is to calm down the mast cells. Additionally there needs to be a plan when one reacts. Some people have continuous symptoms such as pain. Than they also deal with a massive amount of sever symptoms when encountering a trigger. Due to this there are various elements of the treatment plan.  Almost all people start on two over the counter medications Zyrtec and Xanax. These medications should calm cells. Moreover, other over the counter and/ or prescriptions are used to treat it.

Getting Educated and Finding Support

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Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Pexels.com

Like previously mentioned there are times we encounter a trigger which can result in some symptoms like itching or nausea to life threading symptoms such as Anaplhyaxis. Again treatments vary. Some use benadryl or an Epi Pen or both.

If you or a loved one have mast cell or suspected mast cell please educate yourself as much as possible because it can (and most likely will) save your life. Be sure to connect with others with this illness. Personally, I am a huge fan of Facebook support groups and there are some fabulous ones for Mast Cell. My favorite Mast Cell Facebook Support Group can be found here Mast Cell Activation Syndrome Support (MCAS only). This group has the best resources I have found to date. It also makes it easy to get educated and find support.

Need some extra information? Check out these wonderful resources: 

  • Mast Cell Research: http://mastcellresearch.com/
  • The Mastocytosis Society https://tmsforacure.org/
  • Mast Cell Activation Syndrome: The Immune System Gone Wrong https://www.drlam.com/blog/mast-cell-activation-syndrome-the-immune-system-gone-wrong/32795/
  • Mast Cell Activation Disorder | Diagnosis Discussionhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYje4mmh5mk

    Living with EDS: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qv40McIWocU

 

 

What are your tips for living with Mast Cell?

*Please note this is a very brief overview of this disease. Many medical professionals are not fully educated. Please subscribe to be notified when the next mast cell post comes out.

1 in 5,000

We always knew I was different. Completely aware I was rare. Everyone has always made jokes about it here and there due to the silliness of it all. But it wasn’t until recently that it was discovered that I am one in 5,000-8,000 people rare. More rare than just a few extra parts. More rare than a strange combination of chronic illnesses.

This journey officially began this past fall with a bleeding flare. I was bleeding easily while on my normal steroid dose. It was irritating me enough to mention it to my doctor. After extensive research and dissing it all we agreed that EDS was a possibility. I was advised to see a geneticist. A three-month wait and a two-hour appointment appeared to be yet another dead end. The doctor was not educated enough in each type of EDS to accurately diagnose EDS. While I knew an EDS diagnose would not change my treatment plan I was extremely frustrated. I was left with no answers to my bleeding which was progressing and a bunch of symptoms that did not fit into a symptom list of any of my current illnesses.

While I knew an EDS diagnose would not change my treatment plan I was extremely frustrated. I was left with no answers to my bleeding which was progressing and a bunch of symptoms that did not fit into a symptom list of any of my current illnesses. (*Note there is still question if EDS is present).

I moved on as we all do when no answers are clear. I had a voicemail when I returned home one afternoon. Neither my mom nor I recognized the doctor’s name left for me, so I concluded they had the wrong person. I returned the phone call innocently without much thought. Little did I know it would change my life.

I was told I have HHT. This is the reason my POTS is out of control. Due to my migraines, I would need a brain MRI because they highly suspect that there is something linked to this illness present. Additionally, I would need testing on my heart. Just like that, she wished me a good day and the phone call was over.

I had three initials because the person I spoke with did not know how to pronounce the name. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia. Locating a description was a challenge. Gaining an understanding of the big picture of how this illness had been affecting my body for twenty-three years felt impossible.

“HHT is a hereditary disorder that is characterized by abnormal blood vessels. A person with HHT has a tendency to form blood vessels that lack normal capillaries between an artery and vein. This means that arterial blood under high pressure flows directly into a vein without first having to squeeze through very small capillaries. This place where an artery is connected directly to a vein tends to be a fragile site that can rupture and bleed.

An abnormality that involves a larger blood vessel is called an arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Some people with HHT will also have AVMs in one or more organs. AVMs occurring in the lungs and brain and can lead to serious complications. Everyone with HHT should undergo screening for lung and brain AVMs because if these are detected, they can be treated. The HHT Foundation recommends that all patients and families with HHT be assessed at an HHT Treatment Center for proper screening and treatment.”

From my reading, I learned that at least three genes are mutated in this disorder. There are far more questions than answers as there are with most rare diseases.One article reported less than a dozen doctors who specialize in this disease in America.

Plenty of testing needs to be conducted to give them a full picture of how this is affecting my body. So far a special hearing test/ doctor appointment is set up.  We are waiting to see what heart tests should be run and how often. Lastly, a brain MRI will need to be approved by the insurance. This is half of my medical mess at the moment.

Coping With a Rare Disease:

I have coped with chronic illness by learning as much as possible, then educating others. However, it is impossible for me to gather the amount of information I desire because it simply does not exist. Therefore, my coping methods need to be adjusted. I am confident that connecting with the rare disease community will provide comfort for me. Furthermore, I am asking as many questions as I can come up with for my medical team and setting realistic expectations because they are learning with me.

Each illness comes with a set of emotional struggles. It is tempting to go numb but feeling the emotions is an important step in grieving. Each illness seems to shape our character. I am taking HHT along with all my illnesses one hour at a time with a smile and plenty of uncertain tears.

June is HHT Awareness month. “Light your candle with us on June 23rd – Global HHT Awareness Day – to honor those with HHT who bring light to the world.”

Undercover Zebra

I am so excited to have an amazing EDS warrior guest post today, Hana. Please share to help us raise awareness for this rare disease.
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Ever hear of Undercover Boss? Well, this is Undercover Zebra: Where chronic illness warriors go undercover as healthy individuals to chase their dreams in the real world. On this episode, we have Hana Belanger, an 18-year-old girl with the main diagnosis of  Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (hEDS) who dreams of being a cinematographer in the music industry. As an adolescent, she must figure out her own identity, chase her dreams, and not let a rare disease define her. If you think this to be a challenging feat, then you are right. She is…an undercover zebra.
I start every morning the same way, not wanting to get out of bed. Whether it be my 5:45 school alarm to Bowling For Soup’s “High School Never Ends” or sleeping in past noon on the weekends, the act of waking up is just another arduous chore no likes to endure. So far, just like any other teenager in the world, or really, any non-morning person in society.
Once I finally persuade myself it is worth getting up, I “oil” my joints with either Icy Hot or Arctic Ice analgesic gel. Whichever I just happen to have on my bedside table at the moment. Hypermobility is a symptom of EDS, however, in the morning I find that my joints much rather be stiff with pain, like the Tin Man from The Wizard of Oz. I also tend to take this time to pop back in any joints that may have popped out of place while sleeping the night before. Got to love all those constant dislocations and subluxations. More symptoms due to the faulty collagen my body produces. Mornings with a connective tissue are never boring.
Next step is getting dressed. My favorite comfortable get up has to be pajamas, especially my zebra print ones. Sadly, school dress code does not allow for pj’s. Next best outfit of choice? a baggy band t-shirt and a pair of leggings. Don’t forget to accessorize with wristbands, a mood stone choker, and a plethora of braces and KT tape to keep all those joints in place. Pretty sure my joints like to go out more than I do. I always am found wearing my knee braces, but my collection expands to wrist braces, ankle braces, a back brace, and even a neck brace. I also have a cane I decorated in zebra print duct tape because when you need some extra support you have to make sure its cripple swag awesome.
My morning concludes with the breakfast of champions: AKA medication and vitamins. Then, on school days, I rush off to spend 6 long hours so I may be educated enough to graduate. After 12 years of this grueling routine, it does become tedious. I also have a work study internship with my local cable access station, a slam poet, and freelance videographer. The last three are the most fun I believe and give me a huge platform to be myself. When I am on stage or behind a camera I do not feel like the sick kid. I feel like a poet. I feel like a professional videographer. I feel…human.
Many days it is hard to hide the pain I am going through. EDS likes to throw curve balls more than Alton Brown on his show “Cutthroat Kitchen.” Often I wake up with migraines and nausea, which takes hours and even sometimes all day, despite medication. I have injured myself in school walking to lunch and working a one-hour film shoot. It’s as if EDS does not want me to live my dream.
But I will not cave into this awful disorder. That wouldn’t be very punk rock of me to give in. I know my limits and I go as close to the line without crossing over. I make sacrifices when it is safe to do so to enjoy myself. I have been to music festivals and concerts, filmed all day events, went to my Junior Prom, etc. EDS does not have to rule how I live. I just have to adapt to my circumstances in order to survive.
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Illness Awareness Month

Illness awareness months are a big deal providing an avenue for education. Furthermore, it gives those enduring the illness a set apart time to celebrate all the victories they have had over their illness. It seems more socially acceptable to take off the healthy person mask revealing how life is with a monster on the loss inside. Our awareness month also gives us the much-needed reminder that indeed we are not alone despite the feeling of isolation. It is a cracked door allowing outsiders to get a tiny glimpse into living with a chronic illness.

May is one of those months that someone was like let’s see how many illnesses we can raise awareness for in this month and they might have been a bit overzealous. On one hand, it’s great, especially if the majority of your illnesses have the same awareness month. On the other hand, it is a bit much in a short month.

With a complex illness, you could easily take a year or more talking about the illness, testing, medications, and daily living. Times that by over 12 is hectic. To complicate things a bit more the majority of us have more than one chronic illness!

  • American Stroke Awareness Month (promoted by the National Stroke Association)
  • Arthritis Awareness Month
  • National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month
  • National Celiac Disease Awareness Month
  • Hepatitis Awareness Month
  • Lupus Awareness Month (promoted by the Lupus Foundation of America)
  • Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month
  • Mental Health Month
  • National High Blood Pressure Education Month
  • National Osteoporosis Awareness and Prevention Month
  • Preeclampsia Awareness Month
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Chrons & Ulcerative Colitis.
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

I currently have a diagnosis of the following just from this list: Lupus, Ulcerative Colitis, Osteoporosis, Arthritis, and Asthma. In addition, I might have Autoimmune Hepatitis and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

I always like to challenge everyone to learn one new thing in May about one illness. I am a strong believer in education others about chronic illness. I have encountered medical professionals who have been in need of education (I am not trying to be rude in any way). I have had people in the medical field ask me what’s Lupus? A basic understanding is helpful. Knowing just a little bit helps, even if you are not sick, for the day you encounter someone with an invisible illness.

I could go on all day on this topic, but I won’t as I am sure you have plenty on your to-do list today. Have an amazing day! Be sure to Like Chronically Hopeful on Facebook and subscribe to this blog! There will be a handful of guest bloggers which I am SO excited for!