The Ultimate Treat Guide

I hope you and your pup friend are having a bark-tastic day! I have written a treat guide that I am super excited to share with you. Abby and I share our top treats in this post. My hope is that if you have a sensitive or picky pup this will give you some new ideas.


I learned quickly that most supermarkets where I live carry very few gluten-free dog treats. Therefore, even though I was skeptical, I began researching treats online. I eventually ended up on Chewy. I would highly recommend shopping here because the prices are the best I have seen. Additionally, they ship fast. The longest I had waited for a package from them was three days and I never pay extra to get it here quicker.

A Healthy Balance 

Research has shown that about 54% of dogs are overweight or obese. Yes, dogs enjoy eating. However, their humans are responsible for feeding them properly.  Dogs do not spell love F-O-O-D. On the contrary, they spell it T-I-M-E. The number one reason our pets are overweight is we overfeed them by about 20%.

Those “extras” are another reason dogs are putting on weight. Table scraps is a bad habit to be in for many reasons. High caution should be used and lots of research to know what is digestible for your dog. For example, grapes are dealy but carrots are good for dogs. Too many large cookies, jerky, or biscuit treats contribute to the problem. Lastly, an audience of bones puts on weight.

Of course, the breed of dog effects their weight. Similar to humans, even those who are more prone to being overweight should take preventive measures.

I calculate an estimate of the calories that Abby takes in daily. I schedule ahead of time when she will get a bigger treat such as a bone. When using a bigger treat I will decrease her kibble intake for the day.

Things to consider when buying treats

First, I consider ingredients. I prefer a treat that includes a fruit or veggie. I also consider chemicals added. I go towards low calorie treats that I can break easily. I do this so that we can use them in training. Lastly, the price must be considered. I would say I get two bags once every month or every other month. I recommend also thinking of why you are giving your dog the treat, for example, for training or to relieve stress.

Fruitables Skinny Minis Soft & Chewy 


I love the size of these cookies. Moreover, they are easy for me to break. I love that the main ingredient in this cookie are fruits. They smell like people food. Rich in natural antioxidants, vitamins, and dietary fiber. Low-calorie treat is great for training and as a guilt-free reward for your dog. No wheat, corn, soy or artificial flavors or colors.

Zuke’s Mini Naturals


Again, I love the size. I break these treats as well. These are best kept in the package not put in the cookie jar so that they stay soft enough to break. Seasonings and whole foods help maintain a healthy lifestyle. Less than 3.5 calories per treat. Great for training.

Vita Essentials 


The biggest downside to these treats would be the price. I don’t love them. They are nearly impossible to break. I love that these treats are raw. The calories are a bit higher than the cookie options I talked about above. They are super smelly which can be good when playing find it with treats outdoors. These can be used as high reward treats.



Dogs enjoy chewing. They chew to relieve stress, boredom, to keep their jaw in shape, and to clean their teeth. This is why we offer them bones or chew toys.


Fight bad breath with these natural, wholesome bones made from a blend of fruits and veggies. Assists in removing plaque and tartar.

Bully Sticks

Bully sticks are a healthy long last chew treat. They can be a little pricey.  This is a fantastic alternative to Rawhide which can be dangerous for dogs. Only made from high-protein beef muscle, bully sticks are ideal for your dog. Beef is a complete source of amino acids, which support your dog’s muscles, brain, skin, and coat. This treat is the highest calorie treat that Abby eats. They do have a unique smell but it is not awful in my option.


Elk Antler 


Abby has an Elk Antler on hand that she usually chews in the morning or evening. She has had the same one for at least three months. Antlers are high in healthy minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and phosphorus. The majority of antlers will last a dog months. No smell. I advise researching what brand to get. The first one I had purchased for her she had no interest in.

Himalayan Dog Chew

This is an alternative to the Elk Antler. Again, you can expect this treat to last for a minimum of one month. All natural ingredients: yak and cow milk, salt and lime juice. At the end, when the treat looks too small, you pop it in the microwave for another treat. It becomes a cheese puff texture treat which is devoured quickly. 

Non-Food Chews 

Abbys favorite chew toy is the Nylabone. Nylabones are zero calories. There are a wide variety of textures and flavors to keep your pup engaged. It is essential to note the weight on the packaging. If you purchase one that is less than your dog’s weight you can expect it to break easily.



Great Spoonie Volgs

YouTube is an interesting place. Allowing for entertainment, vlogging, and education. I never used Youtube much until I went away to college and needed to force myself to rest. Of course,  finding tips for living with a chronic illness and encouragement was a plus.


Kelly Patricia is one of my favorite YouTubers and a huge inspiration. Kelly has a gift for encouraging others. She also has amazing faith. Kelly has an interesting mix of chronic illnesses and is still partly undiagnosed. Her story is extremely relatable, especially with the struggle of finding decent doctors. Some of her illnesses include IBD, Endometriosis, and Arthritis.


Lets Talk IBD

Maggie has a great channel featuring Inflammatory Bowel Disease. She has a J-pouch and information on doing feeding tubs as well as coping tips for life with a chronic illness.


Inflamed and Untamed

Sarah also has IBD and is an excellent advocate. She is blunt. She has battled many surgeries, hospital visits, and flares. She has partnered with the Chrons and Colitis Foundation. She has been on multiple IBD discussion panels and has a lot of knowledge about IBD.


Me And IBD

I am IBD Visible because I believe that awareness makes a difference. Education is key to living as healthy as possible. It is key to closing the gap between the healthy world and chronic illness world. Lastly, it is vital for those in the medical profession to gain a deeper understanding and compassion for us and strive for the best medical care. No matter how complex every person deserves the best medical care and to have manageable pain.

December 1st – 7th is Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week. The Chrons and Ulcerative Colitis Foundation says this overall about IBD: “Known collectively as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are painful, medically incurable diseases that attack the digestive system, causing abdominal pain, persistent diarrhea, rectal bleeding, fever, and weight loss. The effects of these diseases are largely invisible, which is why we need to make #IBDvisible!

Crohn’s disease may attack anywhere along the digestive tract, while ulcerative colitis inflames only the large intestine (colon). In addition to the impact on the GI tract, in some patients, IBD may also affect the joints, skin, bones, kidneys, liver, and eyes.”


The pain began at age nine. Growing up, I frequently had stomach viruses. I had issues with being underweight, even though I was eating. I was told I was underweight because I was growing too quickly. The abdominal issues got worse about three years ago. I was unaware that I looked like a walking skeleton. In addition to the pain, I would have 15 -25 trips to the bathroom with diarrhea. I have encountered so many issues medically that it is a blur when some symptoms began. Eventually, I saw blood. It was a vicious cycle of medical testing and retesting. At one point in time, I swore I was done with the stomach stuff. Done seeing doctors. Done going through the tests.

Last April, I was in the I’m done state of mind when I encounter a huge flare. Of course, my mom brought me to the hospital. My liver enzymes were sky high. Despite the fact that I did not want to go through yet another colonoscopy one was ordered. I was positive for Ulcerative Colitis. The hospital doctors explained that they don’t see cases very often like mine. I have about five autoimmune diseases. I was in the hospital ten days. Despite their good efforts to avoid steroids, I ended up on a whopping 60 milligrams.

And so, the battle continued and continued to this day. I now have a gastro who I trust and like. One who listens, has compassion, trust me, and tells me everything I need to know. I struggle with eating daily. There is no set IBD diet. My current treatment plan consists of Prednisone, Balsalazide , and Remicade.

The journey with IBD is unique for everyone. If you are diagnosed with IBD I would like to encourage you to check out these links:Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, Inflamed & Untamed, and Kelly Patricia.  CCFA has on its website: “We need to make IBD visible! Why be IBD visible? While IBD patients may look healthy internally they may be suffering. The toll IBD takes on the entire patient lies hidden underneath, significantly reducing public understanding of what IBD is and how it affects quality of life. YOU can change this by getting involved and sharing your stories, giving a face to these diseases.”

  • December 1: A focus on IBD advocacy.
  • December 2: The focus is how IBD is an invisible illness. The whole “but you don’t look sick,” thing.
  • December 3: The focus will be on pain.
  • December 4: The focus is on fatigue this day.
  • December 5: Mental health is the focus on this day.
  • December 6: Complications of IBD will be the focus of the day.
  • December 7: Community is the focus.

This week use the Twibbon to raise awareness. Share your story on social media. Use #IBDVisible. Share your story with the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation linked above for a chance to be featured on the web page.


Dysautonomia Awareness

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October is slipping by fairly quickly because of school and pyelonephritis. I truly wish I had more time to devote to  Dysautonomia awareness month. Millions of people are affected by  Dysautonomia worldwide. Sadly, like with many illnesses, there is not enough research or enough treatment plans. “Dysautonomia is an umbrella term used to describe several different medical conditions that cause a malfunction of the Autonomic Nervous System. The Autonomic Nervous System controls the “automatic” functions of the body that we do not consciously think about.” In addition, I strongly encourage you to take a look at this video from the Dysautonomia foundation.

POTS Awareness Video

The beginning of my POTS symptoms is unclear. I had adapted to my peculiar symptoms. Then I landed in the cardiac unit from an allergic reaction to Reclast about two years ago. My nurse had woke me up a handful of times because of tachycardia. Then I overheard some medical professionals discussing my case and mentioned that I might have POTS. Of course, I did the tilt table a few weeks later with extremely positive results.


POTS impacts my life daily. Some daily symptoms include Tachycardia , low blood pressure, dizzy spells, not absorbing things properly, brain fog, fatigue, and dehydration. In addition, I collapse, shake, and pass out. Currently, my treatment plan isn’t excellent. My doctor refuses to order saline. My only POTS specific medication is tachycardia medication. I do not have additional treatment options at this point in time due to my overlapping illnesses and treatment plan overall.

Accommodating myself is a challenge, to say the least. Hydration is a struggle, especially due to the fact that I cannot absorb fluids properly at times with Ulcerative Colitis.  Gatorade, water, tea, and drip drop are some ways I attempt to fight dehydration at home. At times, my cats can sense when I am going to pass out or have a POTS flare. In addition, I do minor diet modifications. Compression stockings are a must, though I wish they helped a bit more. Whenever I go food shopping I use a wheelchair.  If I am on my feet I clench the muscles in my legs and back to assist blood flow. I never lock my legs. I elevate my legs frequently as well.


Education of POTS is lacking majorly in the medical field. I recently came a crossed a doctor that believed that POTS is purely a psychiatric disorder. Needless to say, I was irritated with the conversation. POTS is a health condition. It is complex. There are no cookie cutter patients. New research suggests that it might be an autoimmune disorder.

The Foundation page has some excellent resources for living with POTS. I hope you learned something from this post! If you live with Dysautonomia share what type and how it impacts your life in the comments. Lastly, if you aren’t in a support group find one. There are a wealth of in-person as well as online support groups.

General Medication Guide

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I can recall a time when swallowing pills were my worst nightmare. I was never able to remember to take my multi-vitamin. And I would avoid medication like the plague. Those days seem a lifetime away in my past along with carefree sunny afternoons of childhood. If you are newly diagnosed, there is a lot to learn, it can be intimidating.

If you are newly diagnosed, there is a lot to learn and a lot that sounds scary. The majority of people with a chronic illness will encounter a medication at some point in time, for many of us, it becomes a daily part of life. It becomes as natural as brushing your teeth.


Constructing a treatment plan and sticking with it is essential making a big difference. The positives and side effects need to be considered before agreeing to any medication. Listening to the doctors expert advice is vital. In addition, I recommend doing your own homework and speaking with others who have taken the medication if possible. Keep in mind that everyone’s body reacts differently. Your body will not react the same way someone else’s has. If you have a caretaker or support system it is also wise to get their option. Personally, I always talk to my mom letting her know what I have learned about a medication, side effects, how long it will take to work, and my thoughts. It is okay to say no if you are not comfortable with taking a particular medication.

Vitamins and Supplements

Vitamins and supplements need to be discussed with your doctor and carefully thought out. I have multiple autoimmune disorders, therefore, my immune system is overactive. Vitamins and supplements boost your immune system, so I need to be cautious as I select only what my body truly needs. Which vitamins I take does vary on what my body needs and what other medication I am on. For example, with Prednisone potassium is one thing I know I need to have. With Depo, I need calcium and vitamin D. If I feel like I am not absorbing things properly I increase my vitamin C. Balance is key. The only other supplement I typically take is fish oil which can assist in brain fog and inflammation.

Over the Counter

Interactions need to be checked, whether it is with vitamins, prescription, or over the counter medications. Again over the counter medications must be discussed with your doctor to ensure it is the best thing for you. By simply talking to your doctor you can avoid terrible interactions and side effects.


Organization is essential in many aspects with a chronic illness. If I didn’t have a system, I would not take my medication or vitamins ever. Especially considering most of us have brain fog. I keep all my medical supplies in a crate. This not only includes my medication but also tiger balm, braces, and chemo supply. I also have a daily pill organizer.

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Knowing when to take medication is important. Personally, I take the majority of mine after meals. Setting an alarm on your phone can be helpful. There are also free apps to help remind you to take medication on time. Having someone you are frequently with check in with you can also be useful.


Whenever I go out I use old pill bottles to store the medication I will need or might need. I have a makeup bag that I put everything such as my inhaler, that I might need while I am out.

How do you stay organized with medication?


I am an expert at passing out, it’s a skill that not many people have. Then again most people do not need this skill. I can recall the seconds leading up to each time I passed out vividly. I have passed out well over a dozen times.  I know when it is going to happen. The warning sings are always the same first I feel dizzy, then my hearing fades, weakness increases steadily, then the vision leaves, and boom I pass out. Once the passing out shuffle begins I spring into action. Either telling whoever is around or by getting to the floor as quickly as possible. Usually someone says my name a few times and I’m back. No biggie. Extremely tiring but not tragic.


October is Dysautonomia Awareness Month.  Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome is a form of Dysautonomia. What in the world is it? “Dysautonomia is an umbrella term used to describe several different medical conditions that cause a malfunction of the Autonomic Nervous System. The Autonomic Nervous System controls the “automatic” functions of the body that we do not consciously think about, such as heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, dilation and constriction of the pupils of the eye, kidney function, and temperature control. People living with various forms of dysautonomia have trouble regulating these systems, which can result in lightheadedness, fainting, unstable blood pressure, abnormal heart rates, malnutrition, and in severe cases, death.” Dysautonomia is not rare, at all, it is just rarely diagnosed. Many people live undiagnosed or misdiagnosed.


The tilt table test is used to diagnosis POTS. Web MD gives this explination of the test: “The test involves lying quietly on a bed and being tilted at different angles (30 to 60 degrees) for a period of time while various machines monitor your blood pressure, electrical impulses in your heart, and your oxygen level.

The head-up tilt table test usually takes one to two hours to complete. However, that may vary depending on the changes observed in your blood pressure and heart rate and the symptoms you experience during the test. Before the test begins, a nurse will help you get ready. The nurse will start an IV (intravenous) line. This is so the doctors and nurses may give you medications and fluids during the procedure if necessary.You will be awake during the test. You will be asked to lie quietly and keep your legs still.”

From my experience the tilt table test made me sick but did not increase my pain. Overall I found the test extremely boring. I was only up a few minutes before I began passing out. They laid me down and pumped me up with saline with extra sodium. The tilt table test does need to be done in the morning.


The most common types of Dysautonomia are: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, Neurally Mediated Syncope, and Multiple System Atrophy.  POTS can develop in the adolescent years and some out grow it. In other cases it is a secondary illness and is a chronic condition. Some POTS patients are misdiagnosed with an anxiety disorder. POTS is not an anxiety disorder nor is it cause by one. The role anxiety plays is a symptom. I received my POTS diagnosis almost a year ago. The possibility of me having POTS was mentioned during my Reclast hospital vacation. I had heard of the syndrome, however my knowledge was extremely limited. Of course I researched POTS before my diagnosis was set in stone. Once I learned more about POTS I knew I had it. It was something I lived with, I just had to get the doctors as usual to see what I already knew. My doctor ran the tilt table test. My POTS presents many obstacles daily. It is an incontinence illness.


Though I like the doctor who is in charge of managing my POTS, most times he is unsure how to help. POTS can be challenging to treat. There is nothing my doctor can currently do other then prescribe a beta blocker for high heart rate. Of course, he advises the normal things such as eat sodium, wear compression stockings, pace yourself, ect…

It has almost been a year sense my official diagnosis. My POTS has improved greatly. This is mostly because of Prednisone. One of the biggest challenges I live with currently due to POTS is various organs not getting enough blood. Again, no one really knows how to help this issue in my body. My balance is off still. Right now it’s great I only fall into walls instead of completely collapsing. Collapsing out of no where is inconvenient and unsafe.

Normal activities are challenging for people with POTS. Being up right, being on their feet for a few minutes, and showering are difficult and sometimes dangerous things.

I watched something on POTS where a doctor recommended anyone with  POTS to wear a helmet in the shower. Comical. And impractical. How would you propose washing your hair with a helmet. Yes, falling in the shower is unsafe but a helmet is not the best solution.


A lot more research needs to be done in order for patients to receive better treatments. That is one reason raising awareness for POTS and other chronic illnesses is essential. Thank you for reading about my POTS journey. I hope it can help someone or that someone can learn something from this post.


Picking A College

An overview of my journey so far in college. Advice for Spoonies looking to attend college.

Most of you know that I’m a college student. My academics are important to me. Lately i have been struggling to keep my head above water in regards to my school work. My abdominal pain has been getting worse daily. It has taken over my life.

I have always enjoyed school over all. Of course there are days I don’t love it and subjects I don’t like.

Preparing for college was a challenge due to my illness. I began my search early but I wish I started sooner. I choose a college three hours away which was not ideal. I had e expected to be able to go to school full time and have a job. I thought once i began medication i would improve quickly. I had unrealistic expectations. I began school two months,after my fifth surgery. I don’t recommend this.

My parents add I soon realize me going to school so far,away want a good idea. My heath got worse. But i was determined to finish the semester. Over Thanksgiving break I had blood in my urine…game over. I knew I couldn’t go back to school. I completed my first semester online. My plan was to get better over break then go away to school again closer to home. However, with a sever double kidney infection that was not an option. Recently I scheduled my classes with the ‘local’  (which is an hour away) community college. I tired to be happy and excited about the change. I greeted the semester with a good attitude and an open mind. The semester busted at the seams with obstacles. I had to receive antibiotics though an IV, a bladder scope, and a few dozen kidney stones. The rheumatologist I had been seeing took me off of my Lupus medications, which complicated things.

I had been able to get ahead with my classes. The flexibility with online learning is great. I completed the semester with a 3.5 GPA. I had been told that I am not a smart person through out my school career. I never expected to do this well in college. Last semester I ended up with a 4.0 GPA which I have mentioned before mainly because I am so surprised by it.

Entering college is scary and ecciting.  Picking a college and filling out the paper work can be stressful. It is a challenge to find the prefect school for you. I don’t know about you but I don’t know how I’ll feel five minutes from not never mind in a few months to a few years. I recommend beginning your college search as early as you can, this way you will have plenty of time to consider your options and it will be less stressful.

The biggest question is: is it realistic to live on campus (if that’s one of your dreams). It is best to discuss this with whoever helps take care of you, anyone in your support system, a school counselor, and your doctor. You need to make sure your health is stable enough to make that huge jump to living on a college campus. I would recommend either picking a college fairly close to home or near relatives or a close family friend. This way if you end up in the emergency room, are going for extensive testing, or need support someone you know well and trust fully is there for you.

In addition to being close to someone who knows your medical history and you trust there are many other factors to consider when choosing a college.

Some questions to ponder while searching for what college you will attend:

  • Consider what the area is like compared to wear you live. Is it city, suburban, or rural? Will living in the city for example affect your health? Personally I cannot live in the city due to the air and noise.
  • How close is the nearest hospital? What type of a reputation does it have?
  • Will you need to switch doctors? (If so, it is best you do research on what options you have for a new doctor. You want to be sure they know what they are doing and can properly care for you.)
  • Where is the pharmacy?
  • How long can I expect to have insurance coverage? (For example, up to what age am I covered? Do I need to be a full time student to receive or “get” full coverage?
  • Is there a nurse or licensed practitioner?
  • How big is the campus?
  • Where will you be living? Is the dorm building handicap accessible?
  • How many people will you need to share a room and a bathroom with?
  • Whats the food like? Would your body be okay with what the serve?

Let me know your thoughts in the comments! If you are in college currently or have already graduated please share other things to consider when picking a college.