Shake it Off

Living with a chronic illness is a challenge beyond words when encountering people who don’t understand. We have all had an experience of rudeness beyond belief. There are stairs when taking medication in public. Rude remarks when using a walking device. 

 I cannot tell you how many times people have been disrespectful or stared at me because I use a wheelchair in a store. The majority of the time people either stand in front of me, unwilling to move or practically run away. People act like I have the plague. I have heard over the few years I have used a wheelchair in a store that I am too young to use one or too pretty. The stairs and remarks make me feel like I owe people an explanation. However, I do not need to explain my life to everyone I encounter. If the right doors are open to education someone I don’t mind but there shouldn’t be a social pressure to explain it all. 

 Many people doubt the intensity of our pain and they question if we are indeed really sick. No one seems to understand battling against your body and taking care of yourself is a full-time job. Simple tasks are draining. Some people go out of their way to upset us or to be rude. They offer unnecessary options on how to break free of the chronic illness chains.

 

Too often Spoonies lose friends due to their illness. Some people want absolutely nothing to do with us while others act strangely towards us. 

Too often people judge us before they get to know us. People treat us at times like we are nothing or are stupid. 

Too often we hear phrases like: 

But you don’t look sick

You need to be more positive

Have you tried…

You’re too young to be sick

It must be nice not having to go to work/school

You’re just having a bad day

You need to get more exercise

It’s all in your head

Maybe if you got out more

These things get under a spoonies skin, to say the least. When people mistreat you, SHAKE IT OFF. It is not your fault. Don’t let them get to you. You are an amazing person. Even though you are ill, you are so valuable. You have so much to offer this world. Shake off the stares, Shake off the negative and nasty remarks, Shake off the heartbreak…. Shake it off.. It’s gonna be alright

Hold your head up high, cause it’s gonna be alright. You have so much courage. You are an inspiration for thriving despite every setback. Sending lots of spoons, prayers, and hugs. ❤

Advertisements

IV Fluids For POTS

Wow, I guess I don’t do health updates that often. I just noticed that it has been six months since my last POTS update.  I haven’t done many updates on my POTS because little progress has been made. Just an overview my pressure is still on the low side, heart rate most times insanely high, falling, near syncope, tremors/muscle spasms,  headaches, and brain fog. Later in the day is extremely difficult especially the closer I get to my Remicade infusion. I am thankful that I now have a rollator walker. It makes life easier after showers to safely get back to my room.

I have noticed the brain fog affecting me more cognitively lately, which adds to my frustration at times. There are times I have dyslexic tendencies while writing. I will switch or mix up letter. My spelling at times is worse. I tend to file that stuff under POTS.

I have had minimal success with POTS treatment. I have been on a tachycardia medication, but it is not consistently doing its job. Somedays even with the meds my heart rate is 160.  The steroids raise the blood pressure slightly but I sill come in at low 100- 115/ 50-85 ish.

Needless to say, my POTS treatment leaves my doctor frustrated, my family frustrated, and me frustrated. Falling every other day or more just isn’t acceptable anymore. I have been doing it off and on for three years now. My body is exhausted. I have injured a few things. My bones are not in a place that this is remotely safe. I kindly but firmly told my doctor we need to do something, anything at this point. It was a long debate with begging

I kindly but firmly told my doctor we need to do something, anything at this point. It was a long debate with begging laying out several creative options; medication changes, IV fluids, or teach me to accommodate my life. I was extremely respectful and compassionate as I always am with every medical professional (I remain that way even with the nasty ones). I thanked him for all he has done furthermore mentioning I am beyond thankful for the hospital. I find it important in the midsts of frustration to express that I am thankful and I understand I am complex but we need to work together so that I can have a better quality of life. Despite my compassionate response things were left at that point in time unsettled. My doctor wasn’t thrilled with my options. At my next appointment, my mom accompanied me as always and sat silently. My doctor was more compassionate, willing to listen, and was impressed with the research I had presented to him.

Despite my compassionate response things were left at that point in time unsettled. My doctor wasn’t thrilled with my options. At my next appointment, my mom accompanied me as always and sat silently. My doctor was more compassionate, willing to listen, and was impressed with the research I had presented to him. Even so, I could tell he was not sold on the idea of using IV fluids to treat my POTS, however, we had tried everything else. It seems too simple. Too basic. Thankfully, he allowed me to try which is all I could ask for.

You, need to learn how to be your own advocate. Speaking up doesn’t mean throwing a fit or being nasty. Speaking up can be done compassionately and with respect. It gives you a voice, an active part in your health, and respects your body. Never be afraid to ask questions or say no.

Today I got my first round of IV fluids. I also had my Remicade infusion, which I will do a separate post on. I was at the infusion center for four hours total and a four-hour round trip. I am expecting to notice a difference tomorrow.

So for anyone who is wondering, how can simple saline help POTS, I will gladly share. More research is needed, but the results to me are amazing and worth trying if your POTS doesn’t comply with normal treatment. Most of us are very dehydrated this, of course, helps with hydration. Additionally, it can help blood pressure, heart rate, decrease passing out or near passing out episodes, help the person stay upright, and possibly more. In my case, the hope is to also decrease shaking, improve brain fog, decrease infections (that could be related to dehydration), and decrease kidney stones.

Today I got about a litter and a half. Furthermore, I was told to keep up all fluids by mouth. Very rough estimation 50-60 ounces by mouth which are a slight decrease from a normal day. I will have two additional tiral runs of fluids next week at a center called Chronic Care. I am extremly hopeful with this treatment.

Everything But The Kitchen Sink

I am thrilled that finals week is finally behind me. Whoever invented finals is not my best friend. I love school, but finals week is too much stress. I will be graduating this week with my Associates, finally. Then a summer course, and I am completely done with community college. There are a few things in the air in reference to where I will be continuing my education at. Both my options are great. I am trusting in God to direct my steps and I am excited to see where He is leading me.

A few days before finals, I passed out for about ten minutes, while taking my cat to the Vet. (Poor Kitty was scared outta her mind). I didn’t have my typical warning signs. I am doubtful, it was just POTS, but then again who knows. Hours later I went to the Emergency Room.  My doctor isn’t clear about what an emergency is, therefore I have to be a pain and call to find out. The conclusion of the visit was I did not have a heart attack and no bleeding on the brain. I am going through a period of falling and dizzy spells once again, which is irritating. I have had intense muscle  pain in my legs which has made me wonder if it’s som how related. I have discovered a few things that help a tiny bit with the muscle pain: Village Natural Soap, Dr. Teals Pure Epsom Salt Body Oil, and tiger balm. The soap and oil are excellent for chemo skin. These are the first things that have helped my chemo skin.

30041DjmCPfASL

I am back on steroids for a short amount of time. The goal is to be off sometime in June. I switched from Methotrexate to 6 MP also known as Mercaptopurine. 6 MP is also a chemo and the dosage is higher. I noticted there isn’t as much paticent information as Methotrexate. I have been on it almost a month. I take it after dinner because in the beginning I was having migraines. The first two weeks was difficult. My assumption is because it’s a higher dose of Chemo. If this doesn’t give me the assistance I need we will be adding a biologic. Personally, I am comfortable with this option, more than ready to begin, and I think it is a good step. Many meds help both Lupus and IBD. Right now, it is another waiting period, which is always hard.

Currently, I am able to eat which is always exciting. I have a lot more options with food on steroids. In moderation, I can do fruit, juice, and small amounts of veggies. Being able to eat healthy is a treat.

We have had a lot of rain lately where I live. My hip and arthritis in general, have been less than happy about this. I am still not sure what is going to happen with my hip. Still having issues finding a doctor. Life is complicated with a chronic illness, as well all know.

Here are some pics of the Lupus hand sign from awareness day:

 

I will be posting more on the blog now that the semester is over. I have been working hard on a few posts and I am excited to share them with you! How have you been doing? Let me know in the comments.

13124679_579687415526455_6651819554853380779_n.jpg

Oh! And by the way, I have made a new e-mail for the blog, being that I got locked out of my old e-mail after my concussion. hopefulspoonie@gmail.com

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

30 Things About My Invisible Illness You May Not Know

1.The illness I live with is: My main illness is Lupus. I have autoimmune and an additional half dozen.
2. I was diagnosed with it in the year: 2013
3. But I had symptoms since: Childhood.

196732_1956236312316_16177_n
4. The biggest adjustment I’ve had to make is: Not being able to be in the sun not being able to be on my feet for to long.
5. Most people assume: That I’m healthy, faking, or lazy. That I don’t do anything productive on a regular day.
6. The hardest part about mornings are: Being dehydrated. Dizzy spells.
7. My favorite medical TV show is: Diagnosis Me
8. A gadget I couldn’t live without is: My heating pad.
9. The hardest part about nights are: Getting to sleep & saying asleep.
10. Each day I take __ pills & vitamins. (No rude comments, please) Currently about 15. I also do chemo, self-injections, once a week. Please no rude comments, but feel free to privately ask me about my treatment plan! =]

11888051_935586879797869_2349040824378437850_n
11. Regarding alternative treatments I: I have tried a lot of different treatments. Currently in regards to alternative treatments I maintain a healthy diet, aroma therapy, and keep stress levels down. A lot of ‘natural’ treatments can be risky for my combination of illnesses.
12. If I had to choose between an invisible illness or visible I would choose: I don’t prefer one over the other. Most days I my illnesses are 110% invisible. I have worn braces or used walking devices and some people are just as judgmental. You’re too young to use that.
13. Regarding working and career: It is difficult that I cannot work right now. I am a full time college student and patient.

dog_glasses1

14. People would be surprised to know: I am busy despite my illness. I try to be transparent about it in hopes that others can open up about their illness. In no way am I looking for sympathy I want to encourage, support, and educate others.
15. The hardest thing to accept about my new reality has been: I need to rest and slow down.
16. Something I never thought I could do with my illness that I did was: Achieve a 4.0 GPA.

20150426_223046
17. The commercials about my illness: Ha. They are great… now only if the TV would play them…
18. Something I really miss doing since I was diagnosed is: I miss being normal. Doing normal activities like going out with friends, mission work, and being outside especially in the sun.
19. It was really hard to have to give up: Doing mission work and being outdoors for extended periods of time (AKA on a sunny day more than 5-10 minutes)
20. A new hobby I have taken up since my diagnosis is: Running a Facebook page, a blog, coloring, and crocheting.
21. If I could have one day of feeling normal again I would: Something outdoors, maybe visit the ocean…One day mission trip? So many possibilities!
22. My illness has taught me: To cherish every moment.

11953249_10207567457774521_5366497583257886666_n
23. Want to know a secret? One thing people say that gets under my skin is: You don’t look sick.
24. But I love it when people: Listen. And are supportive.
25. My favorite motto, scripture, quote that gets me through tough times is: So many to choose from! I love, “The Lord will Fight for you, you need only to be still” Exodus 14:14

containing-814579_640
26. When someone is diagnosed I’d like to tell them: To educate themselves. Allow yourself to grieve and to adjust to Lupus. Learning to pace yourself is key. You will inspire so many people!
27. Something that has surprised me about living with an illness is: How rude some people are, especially those in the medical field.
28. The nicest thing someone did for me when I wasn’t feeling well was: Spend time with me and being supportive. Don’t under estimate the power of a simple short conversation or a gentle hug.
29. I’m involved with Invisible Illness Weekbecause: I feel obligated to share my story and assist others with chronic illness in any way possible. My hope is that others will be encouraged, learn, and find support through my openness. I am bursting with excitement for invisible illness awareness week. I hope you will join me in learning about invisible illnesses, celebrating those who have overcome obstacles their illness has presented, and sharing inspiring stories. Together we can put a stop to the assumptions of invisible illness. We can make invisible illness visible. https://chronicallyhopeful2014.wordpress.com/2015/09/08/invisible-illness-awareness-week/

askme

 30. The fact that you read this list makes me feel: Excited.

blogger-badge03

My Invisible Fight

If you know me, you know I am chronically ill. My illness does not define who I am but it is a part of me. I look at as a trait not necessarily positive or negative. Like having brow hair, an oval face, or having dimples. My invisible fight. Words that empower. Words that inspire. Words that sum up my life over the past few years.

Without a doubt I have become a fighter, in this invisible fight. Few people know the details of my fight. Chronic illness is much more than what is seen on the surface. The battle is within. Falling apart only behind closed doors.

myfight2

I had many encounters with terrible doctors. No one took me seriously (I still struggle with this today). Doctors downplayed any concerns. My mom was my advocate, my voice. Growing up I was dangerously shy. If someone were to look at me crossed I would shrink back into my shell. Hearing my middle name released a waterfall of tears. Speaking up, was terrifying for me. Gradually I began to find my voice and become my own advocate. I have educated myself on treatment options, my illnesses, and everything medical that is relevant. I have learned that I know my body and my illnesses better than any doctor. After all I am the one who lives with it every moment of every day.  I fought to find my voice. My mom and I fought to find good doctors.

My health began to spin out of control in high school. It became evident that something was really wrong. Little by little new symptoms would develop. A new rash, unbearable pain, sun sensitivity, collapsing, weight loss, hair loss, and that was only the beginning. Medical testing became the norm of my life. Blood work that included more than thirty tubes of blood, MRIs, x-rays, GI studies, CATSCANS, scopes, EKGs, EEGS, and other medical tests that I cannot recall the names to. In addition, I had five operations in high school. The operations ranged from removing my tonsils to removing cysts to explority surgery.I thought I had hit rock bottom my junior year of high school, after an encounter with a medication that caused seizures. Little did I know rock bottom was much further down. Little did I know that I would long to go back to those high school years and deal with that pain and those symptoms.

I felt like the pause button has been hit one too many times. I have been home bound many times over the past six or so years. Every time play was hit and I began to recover, get stronger, and move forward pause would be hit yet again. It seems like each time my life is put on pause gets longer and finding the play button becomes more difficult. 

My invisible fight was taken to a new level in college first due to pluricy. Then to finding bloody urine that indicated a sever double kidney infection lasting four months. I was taken off my Lupus medication which gave Lupus permission to recklessly attack. I began seeing doctors every few days, had medical testing weekly, and became a regular at urgent care. I landed myself in the cardic unit last September. I continued to get worse. More testing. More doctors. More pain. Hopeless.

My symptoms shifted. My abdomen began to give me issues again. This time it was worse. Abdominal swelling to the point of looking at least six months pregnant was my newest symptom.  I began to question how much more my body could take. How many more days of intense pain that sent me to bed screaming and doubling over. I was taped. Giving in to the fight was tempting. No one had answers. No one knew what to do.

Things were terrible. Eating was difficult and staying hydrated was nearly impossible. The fatigue was thick yet my body wouldn’t surrender to sleep. I had to rest going up or down the stairs. Breathing was a chore. Shower a hazard. Daily tasks seemed like huge projects. Some days I couldn’t bend down to put on my own socks.

Finally it happened. This past April, I hit rock bottom. I could barely move. The pain and fatigue were more intense than I can describe. I was admitted to the hospital for ten days. https://chronicallyhopeful2014.wordpress.com/2015/05/02/hospitalization/

Looking back I believe that being admitted was the best thing for my health overall. I was at rock bottom. It was more difficult to keep moving forward than I can describe.

When I received the message on Chronically Hopeful inviting me to help and participate in Invisible Illness Awareness week I was shocked and over joyed. I firmly believe that sharing our invisible fight stories is vital. Someone had shared the fight song. I immediately connected with it and shortly after fell in love with the lyrics. I feel like that is where I am in my invisible fight, taking back my life. Taking back life after dramatic pauses is difficult. At times it is painfully slow. Progress seems invisible.  Taking back my life and continuing to fight is a daily decision and struggle. I am mastering a new balance act with my invisible fight and the rest of my life.

My invisible fight has probably been the most difficult fight of my life. I know it will continue to be a tough fight. It has caused me physical pain, heartbreak, taken me on an emotional roller coaster, played tug a war with my faith, caused me to lose friends, and lose much more. Yes, there are countless negative attributions of my invisible fight, but I am sincerely and deeply grateful to be in this fight. First of all I am grateful because I believe that God will use my invisible fight for his glory. Through my invisible fight I have matured as a person and as a Christian. I have learned so much. I have meet some of the most inspiring people. I have had the honor of running Chronically Hopeful and helping with the Invisible Illness Awareness Campaign. My prayer is that my invisible fight will be a testomy, inspiration, and blessing to others.

Disability Center

I am preparing to live on campus in a few short months. Recently I did all the paper work for the disability center.
It is best to register with the disability center at the beginning of the semester, even if you are in remission. You never know how the semester will unfold; being sick is unpredictable. It is best if everyone is aware that you are chronically ill. If you had a 504 plan it will follow you to college. If you don’t that’s okay, most colleges will still work with you. 
0_1980
Personally I meet with disability before any of my classes begin. We discus my health and what accommodations would be helpful for me. I sign some papers giving the disability center permission to speak to my professors on my behalf. In addition I e-mail all my professors. I know a lot of people hesitate telling administration about their illness. Personally I believe it is important to try to be open about being ill. I think being open allows others to be open and find encouragement as well. I share a lot of information with my college which you will see in the e-mail I sent to my professors this semester. I am open with my health for several reasons. When I do classes on campus I feel sharing everything about my health is for the best of my well-being. This way everyone knows what to do in the event of an emergency. I do have a history of passing out. If for some reason I could not speak or could not remember basic information my professor and disability would know and be able to share it with paramedics or emergency room staff. Whenever I am not home I wear a medical ID bracelet with basic information on it. In an emergency it is important for those around you to know what illnesses you have, what medication you are on, what medication you are allergic to, and who to contact. The paramedics will  not look in your wallet for a list of medication without your consent. On my ID bracelet I put, “On meds, check wallet.”
3c01b66cff7996cc30ae47b6b4f3cb74
Sorry about that tangent, let’s get back on topic. I also share this information so my professors know that I will miss class sometimes due to flares, doctors, or treatments. I feel it is best to be up front about my health so that they can assistant me through out the semester as needed. Here is a sample e-mail: Dear Professor Name, I hope you are having a wonderful summer. My name is Victoria Guyadeen I will be in your online, Fundamentals of Nutrition course, BIOS 107, this coming semester. I am e-mailing you to inform you that I am Chronically Ill. Mrs.Smith from the disability center at the college will also be in contact with you before this semester begins. My main illness is Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Lupus is an autoimmune disorder, in which the immune system becomes over active and confused. A person immune system should fight off bacteria and infections but when someone has Lupus it attacks the body. It can attack major organs, the skin, joints, and many other things. The symptoms vary from person to person, from day to day. A flare refers to when the disease is active causing increased pain and other symptoms such as fever. Lupus can range from mild to life threatening. I have several over lapping illnesses along with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. These illnesses are: Asthma, Raynaud’s phenomenon, Endometriosis, Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Osteoporosis, Anemia, IBD, Supernumerary Kidney, Kidney Stones, and Migraines. I also have brain fog due to Lupus. Brain fog has to do with memory. It can range from mild to severe. Mine is moderate. I get lost frequently, forget words and basic information, and sometimes I forget who people are. I am still learning how to work with academically. Due to brain fog I might ask for clarification for certain assignments. Like anyone who is chronically ill I have good days and terrible days. However I never know when I will begin to flare or end up in the emergency room. I still see my doctors frequently and go through intense and time consuming medical testing. Currently I am under the care of four doctors. My doctors are about two hours from where I live. I have begun a new treatment for my Lupus, it is called Benlysta. Benlysta is an IV infusion; I receive it once a month on a Friday. Between the car ride and infusion it takes anywhere from six to eight hours. Of course I will do any assignments a head of time when my treatment is coming up. This is my third year of doing online learning. I enjoy online learning. The flexibility is priceless for me. I am able to work super hard on my good days which allow me to rest more on bad days. I normally work ahead to some degree in case I begin to flare or have doctor appointments. I also work ahead to keep my stress a level down which is vital. Despite my illnesses I set high academic goals for myself. One academic goal I have set for myself for this coming semester is to achieve at least a 3.8 GPA. I am extremely excited to be taking this class and I look forward to working with you. I will attach the letter my primary care doctor wrote for disability. Over the next few weeks disability will e-mail you a full list of my accommodations. Please give me 48 hours’ notice if you decided to change the instructions on an assignment. If you are willing to give me a copy of the syllabus for the fall that would be greatly appreciated, this way I can coordinate with my doctor’s appointments. Thank you so much for taking the time to read this. I apologize for it being such a long e-mail. If you have any other questions or need more information about anything please do not hesitate to e-mail me. I try to be extremely open about my health. I feel the honesty will help me succeed in college. Thank you once again. I hope you enjoy the rest of your summer.
Sincerely, Victoria Guyadeen
(*Note this is an old letter from a few semesters ago).
1394047304izk33
How much you share about your health is completely up to you. Learning how much to share and how to balance college life and an illness takes time. Be patient with yourself. Enjoy your time in college.
Please: Let me know what else would be helpful for you. I could show samples of doctor notes to the professors and accommodation list. Or what other tools would be useful for your college journey.

March Update

*I just wanted to leave a quick note at the beginning of this post. I will be sharing some obstacles that I have encountered lately. I am not doing this for pity, attention, or anything along those lines. I attempt to be transparent with you so that you know that you are not alone. My hope is that my story can provide inspiration, comfort, and support as well as raise awareness for chronic illnesses. With that being said, I will jump right into this post, hope you enjoy.

ad7029a9ba7436435afd10a6c5a52612

I have been MIA from wordpress for a while. I have not had the spoons to write but I wanted to blog. There’s never a dull moment when living the spoonie life. For those of you who do not follow my Facebook page, Chronically hopeful, about two weeks ago I had a bazaar syncope episode. The day it started out unusual, but I brushed it off. Nearly out of spoons at only 11 am I reluctantly retreated to the living room to watch television. I struggle with really resting. It is difficult for me to remain in one position for a long period of time (and by a long period of time I mean more then 5 minutes). In between watching television I made lunch and took my medication

One minute I was seated once again in the living room, the next I’m on the floor a good ten feet from the chair with tears streaming down my face. Laying on the floor I realized that I had passed out. I had collapsed with zero warning signs. I have passed out at least a dozen times before (Like every other POSTIE patience). I can recall what unfolds before I black perfectly each episode. I can tell you till this day what happened the moments leading up to the first time I passed out at age nine. For me not remembering was a red flag. I have passed out so many times I often joke that I am an expert. Normally my vision begins to go then my hearing.

The weather was less then ideal which forced us to go to the nearest ER. I have an extensive negative history with this hospital. The majority of the people do not do there correctly. They never take me seriously. When I was in high school my school sent me there because they believed I was having a heart attack. I had a three hour wait to be checked in.

The hospital has switched management. I was hoping that it had improved however that was not the case. Again no one took me seriously. Only one person was considered who didn’t have the authority to assist me.

All of my doctors were informed about the episode and found it bazaar just as I did. The impact of my fall aggravated a few things. I have had an increase in migraines and have began experiencing numbness on the right side of my body. In addition I have had memory issues, trouble focusing, and extra fatigue. I have a few doctors appointments coming up. I am wearing a heart monitor once again just to rule out any additional heart problems and potentially to rule out POTS being the cause of that episode. (I will do a review on the monitor. It is a different one then the one I had in the fall.)

545f6fc47f8dabb535d73aa5eab58168

In a way my condition is stabilizing in the sense that I am not encountering additional symptoms daily. Though everyday is packed with various obstacles. It has been extremely difficult for me to stay on top of my school work. I am use to going ahead with my work, right now I’m barely keeping my head above water. Every assignment takes three times as long as I am use to. Occasionally I have difficulty comprehending what I have read. Needless to say this has been frustrating for me.

I try my best not to focus on the things I do not accomplish or the negatives, though I’ll admit there are many times I fail at this. For now I am taking everything one day at a time, one assignment at a time, one moment at a time. I know this is temporary. I also know being frustrated is normal. I have learned to that it is okay to feel anyway emotionally that I need to at any given moment. I just can not stay in a negative mind set or allow myself to act negatively because of my negative emotions.

If you have several chronic illnesses you know when one illness flares, every illness flares. My Lupus is throwing a fit because I am due for my Benlysta soon. My stomach is still misbehaving as well. Hopefully I can get everyone to calm down and behave soon… or maybe they can all go on vacation lol.

download

How have you been doing? Comment below and let me know, I love hearing from you. Please subscribe to get blog updates!  Later this month I will be doing several posts which I am excited about including: Endometriosis Awareness, Paw Prints on My Heart, and a College post.  Sending lots of spoons, prayers, and hugs ❤

Birthday

1891144_10203299409752740_468643173_n

My parents and I all have our Birthdays in January. What’s even more unique is my mom and I share a birthday, which is today January 28th. The first six years of my life I was an only child. I adore being a big sister, but I am grateful for the years I spent as an only child. I believe those years allowed me to develop a special bond with each of my parents. “You love your parents, but as you get to know them you fall in love with them.” I believe this quote is absolutely true. As a child, our parents are heros. As teenagers, we drift away from our parents. We are so consumed with our lives, we don’t take enough time to get to know our parents and cherish the small amount of time God lends them to us. I cherish the time I have with my parents.

mommyandme

My mom and I have always been close. She is the reason I am who I am today. I couldn’t ask for a better mother. God has truly blessed me. She has been with me for every appointment, ER trip, urgent care trip, every test, and every surgery. She’s the one who calms me down when Prednisone makes me crazy or when I’m just overwhelmed with everything. She is a huge encouragement and the source of strength. I am blessed that she introduced me to the Lord and raise me in a church. I am blessed that my mother encouraged and allowed me to go on missions trips and retreats. She always encourages me to lean on the Lord and to find strength in him.

1382978_254074251408376_2037611585_n

I wish I could remember all the wonderful moments we shared together as I was growing up however my illnesses have impaired my memory. I cherish the few things I remember, the stories I am told of these moments, the home videos and countless pictures I have.

1509975_435190809963385_2122298459074226231_n

I know my illness is extremely difficult for my mother, which is heartbreaking for me. She is an admirable woman. I can only strive to be half as amazing, compassionate, and loving as she is. The strength she has always leaves me in awe. She has overcome and given so much in her life. I God every day that He blessed me with my mother. Thank you is not enough for everything she has done for me. HAPPY BIRTHDAY MOM!

Today, at 2:14 pm I turn 21 years old. I did not think I would see this day. There were many times I wondered if I would wake up in the morning or if the Lord would send his angles to carry me to his arms. I’m only 21, but I have fought for my life a number of times. There are a thousand reasons I should not be alive, but for whatever reason the Lord has allowed me to still be here. 

 Most people cannot wait for their 21st birthday, however I am not most people.As my birthday approached I began to dread it. Another year has passed, making me yet another year older. 21. I have never been a fan of getting older. For as long as I can remember I wanted to stay in toy land, to stay a child. For me growing up was something I dreaded and feared. Until recently I never understood why. Now I am beginning to understand this bazaar fear. The fear is rooted entangled with pain. I began have chronic pain around six years old. Continuously I have associated getting older with more chronic pain as well as my health becoming more complex.

10882315_435192296629903_2410027506878803249_n

Though I’m not thrilled to be 21, I am grateful to be alive and to have another year. Today is a day to celebrate everything I have overcome, being alive, and what I have accomplished. While I was 20 I began my Facebook page, this blog, survived my Reclast experience, achieved a 4.0 GPA, and other various small accomplishments. I look forward with hope to what will unfold during my time as a 21 year old. I hope to achieve at least a 3.8 GPA, get my kidney stones to stop, stabilize my health, grow my blog, become closer to God, and be able to go away to college in the fall.

 “For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb.  I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth.”

Jeremiah 29:11 “For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will hear you. You will seek me and find me, when you seek me with all your heart.”

I hope you have a terrific day, thank you for stopping by! Sending lots of spoons, hugs, and prayers ❤

My Year Review

As 2014 graciously departs, we reflect on the ways it has transformed our lives.  We thank the year for the all the moments we encountered both those in which overflowed with joy and those drenched in hardships.  We have learned an abundance of lessons, encounter adventures, and have flourished in character. I invite you to join me as I reflect on my year.

happy-new-year-2014

Personally, 2014 was discreetly laced with ravishing moments of joy and catastrophe. My health consumed the majority of my time, outside of my academics. One is never truly prepared for a health combat and the after effects. My year began with medical luggage from the previous year. Which included a three month long kidney infection and stones, along with my usual chronic health challenges. Producing a Cytoscopy, I learned I have a fused supernumerary kidney as well as a double collecting system on my right side. (In nonmedical terms this means I have three kidneys and three Ureters.) With persistence the infection cleared up.

In March, my beloved cat Hope passed away. She lost her life to an autoimmune disorder along with internal bleeding. We developed a unique relationship. She helped care for me and provided me with love, support, and encouragement.

1964908_10203509275879262_1282706152_n

Prior to losing Hope, a stray cat wandered into my house where she had kittens. Assisting her emotionally during the forty eight hour birthing session was a unique experience. Kittens and new life in general provides joy as well as hope. Caring for the mother and kittens were excellent therapy for me. After much internal conflict, with the guidance of my parents, I decided to keep the orange kitten who was born second. He had gently wiggled his way into my heart, with no intentions of departing.

10262219_10203790722755258_8459143300179886930_n

From the time I became ill, I have struggled to encounter the right doctor. I encountered many doctors who were disrespectful to me, who did not believe me, who diagnosed and undiagnosed me, and caused stress. These doctors caused the majority of my stress. By brushing my symptoms off, they allowed my body to attack me, thus allowed me to get worse. I was fairly hopeless when I met my current rheumatologist I knew if she was unwilling to help, I would not receive treatment for my Lupus. Just moments before the appointment I saw a Nephrologists. I was told I am mental, there is nothing wrong with me, and the doctor lied to me. That visit left me utterly numb. Praise the Lord my rheumatology appointment went better. A few months after being rediagnoised (for the 8th time) my doctor helped me begin the Benlysta infusion.

10457184_10204169147255634_5988680020757243988_n

Due to complications, I was only able to take nine credits spring semester of 2014. I encountered struggles with the college I attend. Throughout my schooling career I have been told several times that I am not smart and have encountered various academic challenges. For this reason I was beyond shocked when I discovered I had earned a 3.5 GPA for the semester.

In September I was admitted to the hospital due to a life treating allergic reaction to the Osteoporosis medication known as Reclast. Positive and negative things were interweaved into my hospital stay.

The following week, my orange kitten, Tommy got fixed. My mom and I dropped him off, of course I promised to pick him up the following morning. When the phone rang that afternoon, I felt sick to my stomach. The Vet did not sound right as she requested to speak to my mother and didn’t chat with me as she normally would. I digested the fragments of the conversation. My beautiful, energetic kitten was gone. I began to scream and pace. Unable to calm down, unable to understand. My heart broke. We later found out that he has heart disease and a blood clot around his precious heart. Most likely a heart attack stole him.

Recovering from Reclast and keeping up with school work was a chore. Certain symptoms did not improve. I was recommend to cardiology, where we discovered I have POTS.

Though I was consumed with fear I got another kitten shortly after Tommy departed. The Vet and my support system agreed it would benefit my cat Grace and I. We adopted a beautiful curled ear kitten, Saide Rose who is nine months old.

I enjoyed my college courses and succeed beyond my imagination in them. I managed to pull a 4.0 GPA.

I encountered many moments of joy and catastrophe. I am stilling adjusting to life with POTS.  My support system drastically shifted and crumbed in ways. I cherish those who support me and I hold them dear to my heart. I cannot fold into words how grateful I am for the support I do receive. I have been blessed to begin Chronically Hopeful, which includes the Facebook page as well as this blog. I have learned to cherish every moment and to rely on God on a deeper level.  Through God, 2014 has blessed me in many ways.

I would love to hear about your year. Please share in the comments.

Sending New Year’s blessings, hugs, prayer, and spoons. ❤

12 Days of POTYS Christmas

The Twelve Days of Christmas POTS Gave to Me:

12. Dizzy Spells

11. Aches and Pains

10. Tummy Aches

9. Tachycardia Episodes

8. Hours of Nausea

7. Migraines

6. Arrhythmia’s

5. Hours of Dehydration

4. Hours of Chills

3. Nights of insomnia

2. Palpitation

AND

1. Fainting Spell