It is difficult when your illness dictates your life. When you are taped with no way out. Unable to live. Merely surviving one moment at a time. Hope seems light years away. Everything seems to crumble right before your eyes. Everyone has days when they break. It is okay to have break downs as long as you don’t give up. You have everything you need to overcome these struggles.

You are NOT alone. Others feel this way as well. It won’t be like this forever. Eventually you will be able to live life to the fullest again. We must hold on to this hope, for it gives us the strength to keep fighting. Keep your faith. Stay strong. Hold onto hope.  You have so much strength and courage. You accomplish amazing things on daily. Be proud of all you have overcome.

It’s a season for beauty and blessings. Your strong will provide strength and hope to countless people. There will be positive things that occur because of this difficult season in your life. God’s got this. Rest in his loving arms. Blessing are just around the corner. Be open too receive all the Lord has to offer. Gentle hugs spoonie warriors. Sending prayers and spoons.


Wisdome from a Chronic Illness Warrior

I am excited to have a beautiful warrior from the Chronically Hopeful Facebook page guest blogging for us today! “Ellie is a 45 year old woman living in South Carolina.  She has battled Malignant Multiple Sclerosis with grace and courage. She works as a cashier, but is always dreaming of more, she’s just not sure of what more is. Her favorite hobbies are reading, writing and yarn crafts. Her biggest hope in blogging is to help no one ever feel alone in their journeys with chronic illness, or anything else.” Please check out her blog here.


She never wants to meet me for lunch. It’s the only time my health will mostly fully allow me to socialize outside the home. My friends know this. She never answers my phone calls. That email has been sitting there unread for days. He won’t answer my texts, but he’s all over social media with all those silly memes. The phone shouldn’t ring off the hook every time I call for an oil change appointment only for me to come home to 3 messages on the answering machine asking why I haven’t scheduled my service appointment.


There’s no reason I can see for me to be number 68 of 123 on hold for a customer service rep when I call to try and straighten out yet another medical bill. Yet I am. It’s only more aggravation added to a life already made extra stressful by multiple serious and chronic illnesses. Can’t people act right if they’re going to be a blip on my radar? Don’t I deal with enough already just fighting to live?


There’s something I’m forgetting in the throes of all these medical appointments, treatments and pain-  the world won’t stop spinning because I’m always in pain. It won’t even slow down a little. I have to jump up on the ride while it’s spinning, full turbo blast speed ahead. Sometimes there’s a kind passenger already onboard willing to help out, but not usually. I must adjust and remember that people in my life are more than just blips on my radar, even the people just passing through and the strangers I encounter.


In a life full of illness and pain and the extra stress and hardships they cause, people are everything. My city is in the midst of a big cold snap with high temperatures in the 30s. I was sitting outside the library to cool off because my body doesn’t regulate temperature the same way as “normal” people. There was a shirtless man in shorts walking by on the sidewalk. He was singing loudly until a police officer pulled up beside him in his cruiser. I wondered if there was going to be some kind of huge scene because the lyrics the man was singing were not the nicest ones.


There was no scene. The police officer talked to him quietly and then reached back in his cruiser and put a coat on the man. They then got in the car together like they were friends. I hope they went to a shelter if the man needed it.


Many years ago I was grocery shopping with my mom and saw a woman crying in the store. We asked if she was ok. She said yes and we didn’t press the issue, but it didn’t look like she was ok. We carried on with our shopping and rounded a corner and there was the woman full on sobbing sitting on the floor in the produce section. The store manager was on his knees beside her praying. It seemed to help her.


Many years later, this event is still having a profound impact on my life. I didn’t know religion in any way at the time. I was dead set against it, actually, and quite vocal about my lack of faith. Time has changed that, and recently I went back to this store to see if that manager was still there. He was. He too remembered the crying woman. I told him what an impact it had on me. The conversation I had with this manager will stay with me forever, and well, is too private to share, but it, and the crying lady were a huge stepping stone on my path to a faithful life.


Please remember that as we go through life with disease and pain that everyone is going through something. Illness that doesn’t go away does not make our pain different than anyone else’s. It may mean there’s less of a break, but pain is in the eye of the beholder, everyone feels it differently. Just like beauty, and that is a beautiful thing.




Welcome December

I adore the Christmas season, it is absolutely magical. Beauty overflows all around from stunning lights to warm smiles to traditions and so much more. Christmas carols sweetly fill the air. The Christmas season brings joy as it reassures us gently that things will be okay. It helps us connect with our inner child reminding us of the wonderful Christmas memories. At the same time, it encourages us to move forward filling us with a hope like no other. It unites us with those we hold dear in our hearts. I cherish every aspect of Christmas.

Unfortunately chronic illness and the stressful demands that go with it does not take a holiday. The doctors appointments, treatment, and testing still must be done. Chronic illness tends to complicate things and get in the way of our joy during this season. It is easy to lose focus of the beauty in this season when we are consumed with emotion and pain. When the world seems to be caving in on us and everything seems to be falling apart. Chronic illness isolates us. We feel the effects more so this time of year. Finding a balance between doing things and resting becomes more difficult. For some, this season is depressing, reminding them of all they cannot do.

I hope you are able to take the time to rest and reflect this holiday season. Take to reflect about all the ways you have grown as an individual, all you have accomplished, all the blessings in your life, and everything you have overcome the past few months. You, my friend, have come so far. I am proud of you. You deserve to take time for yourself this busy season. You are an inspiration. Your story is breathtaking and laced with beauty along with encouragement it will change lives. I pray your strength is renewed. The Lord will bless you greatly this season, be open to all he has to offer for you.

I pray you would have a flare free Christmas season. I hope that despite your pain you are able to enjoy this season of blessing. Cherish every moment with those you hold dear to your heart. Hold onto the Christmas spirit. I pray that this season would bless you with little to no pain, plenty of spoons, memories, joy, and love. “It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas.”



Crips fall beauty lingers in the air as people hurry to prepare. Nature adorn in the finest hue crafting an elegant view. Thankfulness consumes each heart uniquely setting people apart.

An individual’s definition of thankfulness is transformed when chronic illness enters their life. Simple things possess deep pleasure. Such as a walk in the park or a phone call with a friend. The delicacy of life is illuminated. Cherishing moments with those they adore is vital. Laughter is treasured.

A person’s list of blessings is as exclusive as their heartbeat, which is especially true of someone with a chronic illness. Generalizing thankfulness in the chronic illness world is nearly impossible, so I will share a few blessings of my own.  I am grateful for my medical team. I have made progress from the time I entered this facility. This is the best hospital I have been at. I am deeply blessed for the chance to be on Remicade. Though I don’t like being on medication, I am grateful to have it and for the help it provides. I am thankful for the friends I have made. The support that I have. The lessons I have learned from chronic illness.  I am thankful beyond words for the chance to continue my education at Liberty University online. I feel spoiled with the resources available to me. Fiction books provide a way of coping with pain and I have been blessed recently by Karen Kingsbury’s books.

These are a few examples of blessing from my life as a chronic illness warrior. I hope Thanksgiving day is a day you can cherish. One that is consumed with love, laughter, joy, and spoons. I pray the pain levels are low and the symptoms are few. Happy Thanksgiving Warriors!

When A Warrior Passes

Honestly, I have wanted to write this post for a good two months, but it has been difficult to write.

You know once you have transported to the world of chronic illness that one day you will be devasted when someone passes away. However, you are never ready enough for that moment.

I had expected to eventually lose someone in a Facebook support group not someone I went to school with. Two weeks before she passed I ran into her mom while food shopping. I barely remember anyone from high school and it is embarrassing as well as frustrating for me. But when her mom said her name I could picture her sitting next to me in middle school. I had assumed she moved not that she was chronically ill with at least one of my illnesses. I promised her mom I would talk with her and we could hang out. Her mom said they were attempting to get her paired with a service dog. I was so excited at the possibility of having an in person chronically ill friend my age.

I didn’t hesitate finding her on Facebook.I tried to be patient waiting for her to response constantly reminding myself she was flaring. Within hours I found out I was too late and it broke my heart in a new devasting way. I immediately regretted not connecting with her sooner. I know she suffered way too long and things were horribly unfair. She should be going to college and building a life for herself.

Lossing someone who has one of your illnesses or who is chronically ill is extremely different. I have balled my eyes out many of times for a life of a fellow warrior that I barely knew. My heart goes out to the families in a unique way.  I might not have known them well or maybe not at all yet I live a small part of their story. I live the pain, doctors, symptoms… the life of a spoonie.

The grieving seems to be unique to those with chronic illness. There is an element of guilt for living because you know it could have been you. You wonder why it was that person, what if someone listened better, could it have been avoided, or will that be me one day. Frustration with the health care system at times.  Angry with the people who brush us off.

It has been a few months but from time to time she’ll come to my mind. I wish I remembered more about her other than her pretty hair and sweet voice, like an actual conversation. This death has been completely unique in the way it affected me.

Anytime someone passes with a chronic illness around your age it hits home and it is difficult. When you lose someone to chronic illness allow yourself time to grieve. If someone in the chronic illness community you know passes find a special way to say good bye and to pay your respects. When a girl passed with IBD a few weeks back, I found great comfort in leaving her family a message on an online guest book in honor of her.

Regardless of how close you were let yourself cry if you need to.  Give yourself permission to get angry, to feel hopeless, or broken. Emotions are healthy. They are indicators of things going wrong and of heartbreak. However, emotions are not your dictator so once you have allowed yourself to feel you need to slowly move forward. Allow yourself to heal slowly. Seek support from others who are chronically ill, family, and friends. Cherish each moment in life and live them to the fullest as best you can.



Shake it Off

Living with a chronic illness is a challenge beyond words when encountering people who don’t understand. We have all had an experience of rudeness beyond belief. There are stairs when taking medication in public. Rude remarks when using a walking device. 

 I cannot tell you how many times people have been disrespectful or stared at me because I use a wheelchair in a store. The majority of the time people either stand in front of me, unwilling to move or practically run away. People act like I have the plague. I have heard over the few years I have used a wheelchair in a store that I am too young to use one or too pretty. The stairs and remarks make me feel like I owe people an explanation. However, I do not need to explain my life to everyone I encounter. If the right doors are open to education someone I don’t mind but there shouldn’t be a social pressure to explain it all. 

 Many people doubt the intensity of our pain and they question if we are indeed really sick. No one seems to understand battling against your body and taking care of yourself is a full-time job. Simple tasks are draining. Some people go out of their way to upset us or to be rude. They offer unnecessary options on how to break free of the chronic illness chains.


Too often Spoonies lose friends due to their illness. Some people want absolutely nothing to do with us while others act strangely towards us. 

Too often people judge us before they get to know us. People treat us at times like we are nothing or are stupid. 

Too often we hear phrases like: 

But you don’t look sick

You need to be more positive

Have you tried…

You’re too young to be sick

It must be nice not having to go to work/school

You’re just having a bad day

You need to get more exercise

It’s all in your head

Maybe if you got out more

These things get under a spoonies skin, to say the least. When people mistreat you, SHAKE IT OFF. It is not your fault. Don’t let them get to you. You are an amazing person. Even though you are ill, you are so valuable. You have so much to offer this world. Shake off the stares, Shake off the negative and nasty remarks, Shake off the heartbreak…. Shake it off.. It’s gonna be alright

Hold your head up high, cause it’s gonna be alright. You have so much courage. You are an inspiration for thriving despite every setback. Sending lots of spoons, prayers, and hugs. ❤

Spoonful of Spoonie Encouragment

Mornings for those with a chronic illness are a struggle beyond words. Waking up and willing our bodies to function is a fight. Here is a spoonful of encouragement for spoonie warriors. Happy Monday, brave friend!

You have victoriously made it out of bed this morning. The symptoms and pain are already overwhelming, but you’ve got this. You only need to take today one minute at a time. You have all the strength you need, even though it might not seem that way. Anxiety and depression attempt to dictate your day. Take a breath. Take a break.  Get some rest. Keep fighting to make today the best day possible.

You have been chosen to walk this path. It is one filled with heartbreak, disappointment, and setbacks. Walking the path of someone who is chronically ill is a challenge to say the very least. Being sick has most likely disrupted your flawless rhythm with life. It has stopped you dead in your tracks. Your illness has tried to toss your dreams out the window.

Though this path is difficult, I assure you there is a lot of beauty to be discovered. Sure life is not what it used to be, but the song you sing is just as beautiful. There is hope, joy, love, laughter, and life to be found on this path. You will be able to recreate your wonderful dreams. You are still you, despite your illness. You are an amazing and beautiful person with a flawless story and a huge purpose.

    There will be days that you become overwhelmed and feel completely alone. Your feelings are understandable, however, I promise you, you do not walk alone on this path. There are people who care about you, people who understand how difficult the journey is, and people who want to support you.

I am proud of all you have accomplished. I know you will thrive today. This week will be lovely simply because it is the only choice. While you don’t need to be positive all the time you need to take baby steps forward. You are doing amazing. Raise your coffee (or tea) to a great week warrior!